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Page 63

CHAPTER III
FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY

For trewely confort ne myrthe is noon
To ride by the weye doumb as a stoon,

he declares ; and he proposes that each one of them shall tell two stories going and two more returning, and that when they have come back, a supper shall be given to the one who has told the best story.
This pleases the pilgrims, and they are even more pleased when the cheery landlord offers to go with them, to be their guide and to judge the merit of the tales.
Then come the stories themselves. There are only twenty-five of them, and three of those are incomplete, for Chaucer never carried out his full plan. They are of all
kinds. There are stories of knights and monks ; of giants, fairies, miracles ; of the crafty fox who ran away with Chanticleer in his bag, but was persuaded by the no less crafty rooster to drop the bag and make a speech of defiance to his pursuers. There are stories of magic swords that would cut through any kind of armour, and there is a tale of " faire Emelye," the beloved of two young knights, one of whom was in prison and could only gaze upon her from afar, while the othcr was forbidden on pain of death to enter the city wherein she dwelt.
After the fashion of his day, Chaucer took the plots of his tales from wherever he might find them, but it

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE For trewely confort ne myrthe is noon To ride by what is weye doumb as a stoon, he declares ; and he proposes that each one of them shall tell two stories going and two more returning, and that when they have come back, a supper shall be given to what is one who has told what is best story. This pleases what is pilgrims, and they are even more pleased when what is cheery landlord offers to go with them, to be their guide and to judge what is merit of what is tales. Then come what is stories themselves. There are only twenty-five of them, and three of those are incomplete, for Chaucer never carried out his full plan. They are of all kinds. There are stories of knights and monks ; of giants, fairies, miracles ; of what is crafty fox who ran away with Chanticleer in his bag, but was persuaded by what is no less crafty rooster to drop what is bag and make a speech of defiance to his pursuers. There are stories of magic swords that wou where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 63 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" For trewely confort ne myrthe is noon To ride by what is weye doumb as a stoon, he declares ; and he proposes that each one of them shall tell two stories going and two more returning, and that when they have come back, a supper shall be given to what is one who has told the best story. This pleases what is pilgrims, and they are even more pleased when what is cheery landlord offers to go with them, to be their guide and to judge what is merit of what is tales. Then come what is stories themselves. There are only twenty-five of them, and three of those are incomplete, for Chaucer never carried out his full plan. They are of all kinds. There are stories of knights and monks ; of giants, fairies, miracles ; of what is crafty fox who ran away with Chanticleer in his bag, but was persuaded by what is no less crafty rooster to drop what is bag and make a speech of defiance to his pursuers. There are stories of magic swords that would cut through any kind of armour, and there is a tale of " faire Emelye," the beloved of two young knights, one of whom was in prison and could only gaze upon her from afar, while what is othcr was forbidden on pain of what time is it to enter what is city wherein she dwelt. After what is fashion of his day, Chaucer took what is plots of his tales from wherever he might find them, but it where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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