Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 62

CHAPTER III
FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY

pilgrimage to the shrine of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury. Boccaccio's people were of nearly the same rank ; but on a pilgrimage all sorts of folk were sure to meet, and therefore Chaucer was perfectly free to introduce any kind of person that he chose.
Making a pilgrimage was a common thing in those days, and people went for various reasons : some to pray and make offerings to the saint whom they believed had helped them in sickness or trouble, some to petition for a favour, some for the pleasure of making a journey, and some simply because others were going. Travelling alone was not agreeable and not always safe, therefore these pilgrims often set out in companies, and a merry time they made of it. Some even took minstrels and bagpipes to amuse them on the road.
The Canterbury Tales is Chaucer's best work. It begins on a bright spring morning, when he had gone to the Tabard Inn in Southwark for the first stage in his pilgrimage to Canterbury. Just as night fell, a party of twenty-nine rode up to the door of the inn, and the solitary traveller was delighted to find that they, too, had set out on the same errand. There was nothing shy or unsocial about this pilgrim, and before bedtime came, he had made friends with them all, and had agreed to join their party. A very cheerful party it was, and these good-natured travellers were pleased with the rooms, the stables, the supper, the wine, and especially with the landlord, Harry Bailey, whom the poet calls " a merry man." After supper the host tells them that he never before saw so cheerful a company together at his inn. Then he talks about their journey. He says he knows well that they are not planning to make a gloomy time of it.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pilgrimage to what is shrine of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury. Boccaccio's people were of nearly what is same rank ; but on a pilgrimage all sorts of folk were sure to meet, and therefore Chaucer was perfectly free to introduce any kind of person that he chose. Making a pilgrimage was a common thing in those days, and people went for various reasons : some to pray and make offerings to what is saint whom they believed had helped them in sickness or trouble, some to petition for a favour, some for what is pleasure of making a journey, and some simply because others were going. Travelling alone was not agreeable and not always safe, therefore these pilgrims often set out in companies, and a merry time they made of it. Some even took minstrels and bagpipes to amuse them on what is road. what is Canterbury Tales is Chaucer's best work. It begins on a bright spring morning, when he had gone to what is Tabard Inn in Sout where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 62 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" pilgrimage to what is shrine of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury. Boccaccio's people were of nearly what is same rank ; but on a pilgrimage all sorts of folk were sure to meet, and therefore Chaucer was perfectly free to introduce any kind of person that he chose. Making a pilgrimage was a common thing in those days, and people went for various reasons : some to pray and make offerings to what is saint whom they believed had helped them in sickness or trouble, some to petition for a favour, some for what is pleasure of making a journey, and some simply because others were going. Travelling alone was not agreeable and not always safe, therefore these pilgrims often set out in companies, and a merry time they made of it. Some even took minstrels and bagpipes to amuse them on what is road. what is Canterbury Tales is Chaucer's best work. It begins on a bright spring morning, when he had gone to what is Tabard Inn in Southwark for what is first stage in his pilgrimage to Canterbury. Just as night fell, a party of twenty-nine rode up to what is door of what is inn, and what is solitary traveller was delighted to find that they, too, had set out on what is same errand. There was nothing shy or unsocial about this pilgrim, and before bedtime came, he had made friends with them all, and had agreed to join their party. A very cheerful party it was, and these good-natured travellers were pleased with the rooms, what is stables, what is supper, what is wine, and especially with the landlord, Harry Bailey, whom what is poet calls " a merry man." After supper what is host tells them that he never before saw so cheerful a company together at his inn. Then he talks about their journey. He says he knows well that they are not planning to make a gloomy time of it. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326