Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


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plain, strong words used by himself and his assistants became a part of the every-day language. Moreover, this translation showed that an English sentence need not be loose and rambling, but might be as clear and definite as a Latin sentence, and that English as well as Latin could express close reasoning and keen argument.
Geoffrey Chaucer, 1340?-1400. While Wyclif was preaching at Oxford and Langland had not yet begun to work on his Va'sion, a young page was growing up in the house of the Duke of Clarence who was destined to become the prince of story-tellers in verse. This young Geoffrey Chaucer was the son of a wine merchant of London. He lived like other courtiers ; he went to France to help fight his king's battles, was taken prisoner, was ransomed and set free. He wrote some love verses in the French fashion and translated some French poems, but he would have been somewhat amazed if any one had told him that he would be known five hundred years later as the "Father of English Poetry."
By 1372, the young courtier had become a man " of some respect," and the king sent him on diplomatic Fnissions to various countries, twice at least to Italy. The literature of Italy was far in advance of that of England, and now the works of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio were open to the poet diplomat. Finally, Chaucer was again in England ; and when he wrote, he wrote like an Englishman, but like an Englishman who was familiar with the best that France and Italy had to give.
The Canterbury Tales. A collection of stories written by Boccaccio was probably what suggested to Chaucer the writing of a similar collection. Boccaccio's stories are told by a company

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CHAPTER III
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of friends who have fled from the plague-stricken city of Florence to a villa in the country. Chaucer made a plan that allowed even more variety, for his stories are told by a company who were going on a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE plain, strong words used by himself and his assistants became a part of what is every-day language. Moreover, this translation showed that an English sentence need not be loose and rambling, but might be as clear and definite as a Latin sentence, and that English as well as Latin could express close reasoning and keen argument. Geoffrey Chaucer, 1340?-1400. While Wyclif was preaching at Oxford and Langland had not yet begun to work on his Va'sion, a young page was growing up in what is house of what is Duke of Clarence who was destined to become what is prince of story-tellers in verse. This young Geoffrey Chaucer was what is son of a wine merchant of London. He lived like other courtiers ; he went to France to help fight his king's battles, was taken prisoner, was ransomed and set free. He wrote some what time is it verses in what is French fashion and translated some French poems, but he would have been somewhat amazed where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 60 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" plain, strong words used by himself and his assistants became a part of what is every-day language. Moreover, this translation showed that an English sentence need not be loose and rambling, but might be as clear and definite as a Latin sentence, and that English as well as Latin could express close reasoning and keen argument. Geoffrey Chaucer, 1340?-1400. While Wyclif was preaching at Oxford and Langland had not yet begun to work on his Va'sion, a young page was growing up in what is house of what is Duke of Clarence who was destined to become what is prince of story-tellers in verse. This young Geoffrey Chaucer was what is son of a wine merchant of London. He lived like other courtiers ; he went to France to help fight his king's battles, was taken prisoner, was ransomed and set free. He wrote some what time is it verses in what is French fashion and translated some French poems, but he would have been somewhat amazed if any one had told him that he would be known five hundred years later as what is "Father of English Poetry." By 1372, what is young courtier had become a man " of some respect," and what is king sent him on diplomatic Fnissions to various countries, twice at least to Italy. what is literature of Italy was far in advance of that of England, and now what is works of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio were open to what is poet diplomat. Finally, Chaucer was again in England ; and when he wrote, he wrote like an Englishman, but like an Englishman who was familiar with what is best that France and Italy had to give. what is Canterbury Tales. A collection of stories written by Boccaccio was probably what suggested to Chaucer the writing of a similar collection. Boccaccio's stories are told by a company where is p align="left" Page 61 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" of friends who have fled from what is plague-stricken city of Florence to a villa in what is country. Chaucer made a plan that allowed even more variety, for his stories are told by a company who were going on a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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