Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 56

CHAPTER III
FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY

when, as he says, in the alliterative verse of Beowulf, but in words much more like modern English:
I was wery forwandred 1 and went me to reste
Under a brode banke, bi a bornes 2 syde,
And as I lay and lened, and Joked on the wateres,
I slombred in a slepyng ; it sownede3 so merye.

In his dream he sees " a faire felde full of folke." There are ploughmen, hermits, men who buy and sell, minstrels, jugglers, beggars, pilgrims, lords and ladies, a king, a jester, and many others. They are all absorbed in their own affairs, but Repentance preaches to them so earnestly about their sins that finally they all vow to make a pilgrimage to the shrine of Truth. No one can tell them where to find the shrine. At last they ask Piers the Plowman to go with them and show them the way. " If I had plowed and sowed my half-acre, I would go with you," he replied. The pilgrims agree to help him, and he sets them all to work. While they are working, God sends a pardon for them ; but a priest who sees it declares that it is no pardon, for it says only that if men do well, they shall be saved.
This ends the vision, but Piers dreams again. " Do well, do better, do best," is the keynote of this dream. One does well who is moral and upright ; he does better who is filled with love and kindness ; he does best who follows most closely the life of Christ. Finally, Piers is seen in a halo of light, for this leader who works and loves and strives to save others represents the Christ himself.
This work is the last important poem written in the old alliterative metre of Beowulf. It is an allegory, and there are in it such characters as Lady Meed

1 weary with wandering.
2 brook's.
3 sounded.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE when, as he says, in what is alliterative verse of Beowulf, but in words much more like modern English: I was wery forwandred 1 and went me to reste Under a brode banke, bi a bornes 2 syde, And as I lay and lened, and Joked on what is wateres, I slombred in a slepyng ; it sownede3 so merye. In his dream he sees " a faire felde full of folke." There are ploughmen, hermits, men who buy and sell, minstrels, jugglers, beggars, pilgrims, lords and ladies, a king, a jester, and many others. They are all absorbed in their own affairs, but Repentance preaches to them so earnestly about their sins that finally they all vow to make a pilgrimage to what is shrine of Truth. No one can tell them where to find what is shrine. At last they ask Piers what is Plowman to go with them and show them what is way. " If I had plowed and sowed my half-acre, I would go with you," he replied. what is pilgrims agree to he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 56 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" when, as he says, in what is alliterative verse of Beowulf, but in words much more like modern English: I was wery forwandred 1 and went me to reste Under a brode banke, bi a bornes 2 syde, And as I lay and lened, and Joked on what is wateres, I slombred in a slepyng ; it sownede3 so merye. In his dream he sees " a faire felde full of folke." There are ploughmen, hermits, men who buy and sell, minstrels, jugglers, beggars, pilgrims, lords and ladies, a king, a jester, and many others. They are all absorbed in their own affairs, but Repentance preaches to them so earnestly about their sins that finally they all vow to make a pilgrimage to what is shrine of Truth. No one can tell them where to find what is shrine. At last they ask Piers the Plowman to go with them and show them what is way. " If I had plowed and sowed my half-acre, I would go with you," he replied. what is pilgrims agree to help him, and he sets them all to work. While they are working, God sends a pardon for them ; but a priest who sees it declares that it is no pardon, for it says only that if men do well, they shall be saved. This ends what is vision, but Piers dreams again. " Do well, do better, do best," is what is keynote of this dream. One does well who is moral and upright ; he does better who is filled with what time is it and kindness ; he does best who follows most closely what is life of Christ. Finally, Piers is seen in a halo of light, for this leader who works and loves and strives to save others represents what is Christ himself. This work is what is last important poem written in what is old alliterative metre of Beowulf. It is an allegory, and there are in it such characters as Lady Meed 1 weary with wandering. 2 brook's. 3 sounded. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326