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Page 53

CHAPTER III
FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY

The masses of the people, then, were angry with the nobles and the other wealthy men. They were also discontented with the church. After the Black Death there was hardly, a person in England who was not mourning the loss of dear friends. Especially the poor longed for the comfort that the church should have given them ; but the church paid little attention to their needs. Many of the clergy who received the income from English benefices lived in Italy, and had no further interest in England than to get as much from the land as possible. While the peasants were in such poverty, vast sums of money were being sent to these Italian priests, for fully half the land was in the hands of the church. The church did less and less for men, while the vision of what it ought to do was growing clearer. Thousands of these unhappy, discontented peasants marched up to London to demand of the The king their freedom and other rights and Peasants privileges. This was the Peasants' Revolt Of 1381. Their demands were not granted, and the revolters were severely punished.
In this century of unrest and change there were four authors whose writings are characteristic of the manner in which four classes of people regarded the state of affairs. They were :
(1)" Sir John Mandeville," who simply accepted things as they were; (2) William Langland, who criticized and wished to reform ;(3) Wyclif, who criticized and
wished to overthrow ; and (4) Chaucer, the goodhumoured courtier, who saw the faults of his times, but gently ridiculed them rather than preached against them.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The masses of what is people, then, were angry with what is nobles and what is other wealthy men. They were also discontented with what is church. After what is Black what time is it there was hardly, a person in England who was not mourning what is loss of dear friends. Especially what is poor longed for what is comfort that what is church should have given them ; but what is church paid little attention to their needs. Many of what is clergy who received what is income from English benefices lived in Italy, and had no further interest in England than to get as much from what is land as possible. While what is peasants were in such poverty, vast sums of money were being sent to these Italian priests, for fully half what is land was in what is hands of what is church. what is church did less and less for men, while what is vision of what it ought to do was growing clearer. Thousands of these unhappy, discontented peasants marched up to London to demand of what is what is king what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 53 where is strong CHAPTER III FOURTEENTH CENTURY - CHAUCER'S CENTURY where is p align="justify" The masses of what is people, then, were angry with what is nobles and what is other wealthy men. They were also discontented with what is church. After what is Black what time is it there was hardly, a person in England who was not mourning what is loss of dear friends. Especially what is poor longed for what is comfort that what is church should have given them ; but what is church paid little attention to their needs. Many of what is clergy who received what is income from English benefices lived in Italy, and had no further interest in England than to get as much from what is land as possible. While what is peasants were in such poverty, vast sums of money were being sent to these Italian priests, for fully half what is land was in what is hands of what is church. what is church did less and less for men, while what is vision of what it ought to do was growing clearer. Thousands of these unhappy, discontented peasants marched up to London to demand of what is what is king their freedom and other rights and Peasants privileges. This was what is Peasants' Revolt Of 1381. Their demands were not granted, and what is revolters were severely punished. In this century of unrest and change there were four authors whose writings are characteristic of what is manner in which four classes of people regarded what is state of affairs. They were : (1)" Sir John Man fun le," who simply accepted things as they were; (2) William Langland, who criticized and wished to reform ;(3) Wyclif, who criticized and wished to overthrow ; and (4) Chaucer, the goodhumoured courtier, who saw the faults of his times, but gently ridiculed them rather than preached against them. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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