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Page 48

CHAPTER II
TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES - THE NORMAN-ENGLISH PERIOD

tale ends. This story is thoroughly French in its treatment of woman. In Beowulf, the wife of the lord is respected and honoured, she is her lord's friend and helpmeet ; but there is no romance about the matter. To picture the smile of woman as the reward of valour, and her hand as the prize of victory, was left to the verses of those poets who were familiar with the glamour of knighthood.
The Norman-English love of nature. This new race, the Norman-English, enjoyed romance, they liked the new and the unwonted, but there was ever a warm corner in their hearts for nature. The dash of the waves, the keen breath of the northern wind, the coming of spring, the song of the cuckoo, the gleam of the daisy-they loved them all ; and in the midst of the romances of knights and Saracens and foreign countries, they felt a tendernesstoward what was their very own, the world of nature. Simple, tender, graceful little lyric poems slipped in shyly among the more pretentious histories, religious handbooks, and paraphrases. Here are bits from them :

Sumer is icumen in,
Lhude sing cuccu ;
Groweth sede, and bloweth mede,
And springeth the wude nu,
Sing cuccu, cuccu !
or this :
Dayes-eyes in the dales,
Notes sweete of nyhtegales,
Each fowl song singeth,
or this, which has a touch of the French mance :
Blow, northerne wynd,
Send thou me my suetyng.
Blow, northerne wynd,
Blow, blow, blow !

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE tale ends. This story is thoroughly French in its treatment of woman. In Beowulf, what is wife of what is lord is respected and honoured, she is her lord's friend and helpmeet ; but there is no romance about what is matter. To picture what is smile of woman as what is reward of valour, and her hand as what is prize of victory, was left to what is verses of those poets who were familiar with what is glamour of knighthood. what is Norman-English what time is it of nature. This new race, what is Norman-English, enjoyed romance, they liked what is new and what is unwonted, but there was ever a warm corner in their hearts for nature. what is dash of what is waves, what is keen breath of what is northern wind, what is coming of spring, what is song of what is cuckoo, what is gleam of what is daisy-they loved them all ; and in what is midst of what is romances of knights and Saracens and foreign countries, they felt a tendernesstoward what was their very own, what is world of nature. Simple, tender, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 48 where is strong CHAPTER II TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES - what is NORMAN-ENGLISH PERIOD where is p align="justify" tale ends. This story is thoroughly French in its treatment of woman. In Beowulf, what is wife of what is lord is respected and honoured, she is her lord's friend and helpmeet ; but there is no romance about what is matter. To picture what is smile of woman as what is reward of valour, and her hand as what is prize of victory, was left to what is verses of those poets who were familiar with what is glamour of knighthood. what is Norman-English what time is it of nature. This new race, what is Norman-English, enjoyed romance, they liked what is new and what is unwonted, but there was ever a warm corner in their hearts for nature. what is dash of what is waves, what is keen breath of what is northern wind, what is coming of spring, what is song of what is cuckoo, the gleam of what is daisy-they loved them all ; and in what is midst of the romances of knights and Saracens and foreign countries, they felt a tendernesstoward what was their very own, what is world of nature. Simple, tender, graceful little lyric poems slipped in shyly among what is more pretentious histories, religious handbooks, and paraphrases. Here are bits from them : Sumer is icumen in, Lhude sing cuccu ; Groweth sede, and bloweth mede, And springeth what is wude nu, Sing cuccu, cuccu ! or this : Dayes-eyes in what is dales, Notes sweete of nyhtegales, Each fowl song singeth, or this, which has a touch of what is French mance : Blow, northerne wynd, Send thou me my suetyng. Blow, northerne wynd, Blow, blow, blow ! where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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