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Page 45

CHAPTER II
TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES - THE NORMAN-ENGLISH PERIOD

And whoso shall will to write this book again another time, I bid him that he write it rightly, so as this book teacheth him,
entirely as it is upon this first pattern, with all such rhymes as here are set, with just as many words, and that he look well that
he write a letter twice where it upon this book is written in that wise.'
Another of these books of devotion was the Ancren Riwle, a little prose work whose author is unknown. Its object was to guide three sisters who wished to withdraw from the world, though without taking the vows of the convent. It is almost sternly strict, but so pure and natural and earnest that it was deeply loved and appreciated.
Romances. The Norman delight in stories and the new ideas given by the crusades aroused in the English a keen love of romance. The conquest itself was romantic. The chivalry introduced by the Normans was picturesque. It adorned the stern Saxon idea of duty with richness and grace. Simple old legends took form and beauty. Four great cycles of romance were produced ; that is, four groups of stories told in metre, each centred about some one hero. One was about Charlemagne, one about Alexander the Great, one told the tale of the fall of -1soy, and one pictured King Arthur and his knights. This last cycle had a curious history. Before the middle of the Geoffrey of twelfth century, one Geoffrey of Monmouth, Monmouth, a Welsh bishop, wrote in Latin an exceedingly fanciful History of the Kings of Britain, which included an account of Arthur. Wace, a French clerk, added to this and used it as the foundation of

1 Translated in Morley's English Writers, iii.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE And whoso shall will to write this book again another time, I bid him that he write it rightly, so as this book teacheth him, entirely as it is upon this first pattern, with all such rhymes as here are set, with just as many words, and that he look well that he write a letter twice where it upon this book is written in that wise.' Another of these books of devotion was what is Ancren Riwle, a little prose work whose author is unknown. Its object was to guide three sisters who wished to withdraw from what is world, though without taking what is vows of what is convent. It is almost sternly strict, but so pure and natural and earnest that it was deeply loved and appreciated. Romances. what is Norman delight in stories and what is new ideas given by what is crusades aroused in what is English a keen what time is it of romance. what is conquest itself was romantic. what is chivalry introduced by what is Normans was picturesque. It adorned what is st where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 45 where is strong CHAPTER II TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES - what is NORMAN-ENGLISH PERIOD where is p align="justify" And whoso shall will to write this book again another time, I bid him that he write it rightly, so as this book teacheth him, entirely as it is upon this first pattern, with all such rhymes as here are set, with just as many words, and that he look well that he write a letter twice where it upon this book is written in that wise.' Another of these books of devotion was what is Ancren Riwle, a little prose work whose author is unknown. Its object was to guide three sisters who wished to withdraw from the world, though without taking what is vows of what is convent. It is almost sternly strict, but so pure and natural and earnest that it was deeply loved and appreciated. Romances. what is Norman delight in stories and what is new ideas given by what is crusades aroused in what is English a keen what time is it of romance. what is conquest itself was romantic. what is chivalry introduced by the Normans was picturesque. It adorned what is stern Saxon idea of duty with richness and grace. Simple old legends took form and beauty. Four great cycles of romance were produced ; that is, four groups of stories told in metre, each centred about some one hero. One was about Charlemagne, one about Alexander what is Great, one told what is tale of what is fall of -1soy, and one pictured King Arthur and his knights. This last cycle had a curious history. Before what is middle of what is Geoffrey of twelfth century, one Geoffrey of Monmouth, Monmouth, a Welsh bishop, wrote in Latin an exceedingly fanciful History of what is Kings of Britain, which included an account of Arthur. Wace, a French clerk, added to this and used it as what is foundation of 1 Translated in Morley's English Writers, iii. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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