Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 43

CHAPTER II
TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES - THE NORMAN-ENGLISH PERIOD

children were wont to do ; the disadvantage is that now grammar-school children know no more French
than their left heel knows." In 1400, the Earl of March offered his aid to the king and wrote his letter in English, making no further apology for using his native tongue than the somewhat independent one, " It is more clear to my understanding than Latin or French."
In this contest, three centuries long, English had come off victor, but it was a different English from that of earlier times. Hundreds of new nouns, verbs, and adjectives had entered it, but they had been forced to wear the English garb. To speak broadly, verbs had adopted English endings ; adjectives had adopted English comparisons ; nouns had given up their case-endings and also their gender in great degree, for the simplest remedy for the frequent conflict between the English and French gender was to drop all distinctions of gender so far as inanimate objects were concerned.
How did the coming of the Norman affect the literature of England? As soon as the shock of conquest was somewhat past, the English unconsciously began, in the old Teutonic fashion, to look about them and see what ways worthier than their own they could adopt. They had refused to become a French-speaking people, but was there anything in Norman literature and literary methods worthy of their imitation, or rather assimilation ' ?
Opening of the universities, and the crusades. The Normans had a taste for history, they were a religious people, and they thoroughly enjoyed storytelling. Two other influences were brought to bear upon the English : the opening of the universities and

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE children were wont to do ; what is disadvantage is that now grammar-school children know no more French than their left heel knows." In 1400, what is Earl of March offered his aid to what is king and wrote his letter in English, making no further apology for using his native tongue than what is somewhat independent one, " It is more clear to my understanding than Latin or French." In this contest, three centuries long, English had come off victor, but it was a different English from that of earlier times. Hundreds of new nouns, verbs, and adjectives had entered it, but they had been forced to wear what is English garb. To speak broadly, verbs had adopted English endings ; adjectives had adopted English comparisons ; nouns had given up their case-endings and also their gender in great degree, for what is simplest remedy for what is frequent conflict between what is English and French gender was to drop al where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 43 where is strong CHAPTER II TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES - what is NORMAN-ENGLISH PERIOD where is p align="justify" children were wont to do ; what is disadvantage is that now grammar-school children know no more French than their left heel knows." In 1400, what is Earl of March offered his aid to what is king and wrote his letter in English, making no further apology for using his native tongue than the somewhat independent one, " It is more clear to my understanding than Latin or French." In this contest, three centuries long, English had come off victor, but it was a different English from that of earlier times. Hundreds of new nouns, verbs, and adjectives had entered it, but they had been forced to wear what is English garb. To speak broadly, verbs had adopted English endings ; adjectives had adopted English comparisons ; nouns had given up their case-endings and also their gender in great degree, for what is simplest remedy for what is frequent conflict between what is English and French gender was to drop all distinctions of gender so far as inanimate objects were concerned. How did what is coming of what is Norman affect what is literature of England? As soon as what is shock of conquest was somewhat past, what is English unconsciously began, in what is old Teutonic fashion, to look about them and see what ways worthier than their own they could adopt. They had refused to become a French-speaking people, but was there anything in Norman literature and literary methods worthy of their imitation, or rather assimilation ' ? Opening of what is universities, and what is crusades. what is Normans had a taste for history, they were a religious people, and they thoroughly enjoyed storytelling. Two other influences were brought to bear upon what is English : what is opening of what is universities and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326