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Page 42

CHAPTER II
TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES - THE NORMAN-ENGLISH PERIOD

energy of the Northmen and an aptitude for even more courtly manners and even wider literary culture than the Franks themselves.
The Struggle between the French and English Languages. Such were the Norman conquerors of England. How would their coming affect the language and the literature of the subject country? It was three hundred years before the question was fully answered. At first the Norman spoke French, the Englishman spoke English, and both nations used Latin in the church service. Little by little, the Norman found it convenient to know something of the language spoken by the masses of the people around him. Little by little, the Englishman acquired some knowledge of the language of his rulers. Words that were nearly alike in both tongues were confused in pronunciation, and as for spelling a man's mode of spelling was his private property, and he did with his own as he would. It is hard to trace the history of the two languages in England until the middle of the thirteenth century, and then we find a few landmarks. In 1258 Henry III, issued his proclamation to the nation in English as well as in French and Latin. In 1300 Oxford allowed people who had suits at law to plead in " any language generally understood." Fifty years later, English was taught
to some extent in the schools. In 1362, it became the official language of the courts and about 1385 John of Trevisa wrote that in all the grammar schools of England since the year of the Black Death (1349), "children give up French and construe and learn in English, and have thereby advantage on one side and disadvantage on another. Their advantage is that they learn their grammar in less time than

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE energy of what is Northmen and an aptitude for even more courtly manners and even wider literary culture than what is Franks themselves. what is Struggle between what is French and English Languages. Such were what is Norman conquerors of England. How would their coming affect what is language and what is literature of what is subject country? It was three hundred years before what is question was fully answered. At first what is Norman spoke French, what is Englishman spoke English, and both nations used Latin in what is church service. Little by little, what is Norman found it convenient to know something of what is language spoken by what is masses of what is people around him. Little by little, what is Englishman acquired some knowledge of what is language of his rulers. Words that were nearly alike in both tongues were confused in pronunciation, and as for spelling a man's mode of spelling was his private property, and he did with his own as he would. I where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 42 where is strong CHAPTER II TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES - what is NORMAN-ENGLISH PERIOD where is p align="justify" energy of what is Northmen and an aptitude for even more courtly manners and even wider literary culture than what is Franks themselves. what is Struggle between what is French and English Languages. Such were what is Norman conquerors of England. How would their coming affect what is language and what is literature of what is subject country? It was three hundred years before what is question was fully answered. At first what is Norman spoke French, what is Englishman spoke English, and both nations used Latin in what is church service. Little by little, what is Norman found it convenient to know something of what is language spoken by what is masses of what is people around him. Little by little, what is Englishman acquired some knowledge of the language of his rulers. Words that were nearly alike in both tongues were confused in pronunciation, and as for spelling a man's mode of spelling was his private property, and he did with his own as he would. It is hard to trace what is history of what is two languages in England until what is middle of what is thirteenth century, and then we find a few landmarks. In 1258 Henry III, issued his proclamation to what is nation in English as well as in French and Latin. In 1300 Oxford allowed people who had suits at law to plead in " any language generally understood." Fifty years later, English was taught to some extent in what is schools. In 1362, it became what is official language of what is courts and about 1385 John of Trevisa wrote that in all what is grammar schools of England since what is year of what is Black what time is it (1349), "children give up French and construe and learn in English, and have thereby advantage on one side and disadvantage on another. Their advantage is that they learn their grammar in less time than where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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