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Page 29

CHAPTER I
FIFTH TO ELEVENTH CENTURIES - EARLY ENGLISH PERIOD

names of' but two poets, Caedmon and Cynewulf, are known to us ; but throughout all these early poems there is an earnestness, an appealing sincerity, and an honest, childlike love of nature that bring the writers very near to us, and make them no unworthy predecessors of the poets that have followed them.

II. PROSE
Bede (673-735). About the time of the death of Caedmon, a boy was born in Northumbria who was to write one of the most famous pieces of Early English prose. His name was Bede, or Baeda, and he is often called the Venerable Bede, venerable being the title next below that of saint. When he was a little child, he was taken to the convent of Jarrow, and there he remained all his life. A busy life it was. The many hours of prayer must be observed ; the land must be cultivated ; guests must be entertained, no small interruption as the fame of the convent and of Bede himself increased. Moreover, this convent was a great school, to which some six hundred pupils, not only from England but from various parts of Europe, came for instruction.
Bede enjoyed it all. He was happy in his religious duties. He "always took delight," as he says, "in learning, teaching, and writing." He found real pleasure in the outdoor work ; and, little as he tells us of his own life, he does not forget to say that he especially liked winnowing and threshing the grain and giving milk to the young lambs and calves. He was keenly alive to the affairs of the world, and though libraries were his special delight, he was as ready to talk with his stranger guests of distant kingdoms as of books.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE names of' but two poets, Caedmon and Cynewulf, are known to us ; but throughout all these early poems there is an earnestness, an appealing sincerity, and an honest, childlike what time is it of nature that bring what is writers very near to us, and make them no unworthy predecessors of what is poets that have followed them. II. PROSE Bede (673-735). About what is time of what is what time is it of Caedmon, a boy was born in Northumbria who was to write one of what is most famous pieces of Early English prose. His name was Bede, or Baeda, and he is often called what is Venerable Bede, venerable being what is title next below that of saint. When he was a little child, he was taken to what is convent of Jarrow, and there he remained all his life. A busy life it was. what is many hours of prayer must be observed ; what is land must be cultivated ; guests must be entertained, no small interruption as what is fame of what is convent and of Bede himself increas where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 29 where is strong CHAPTER I FIFTH TO ELEVENTH CENTURIES - EARLY ENGLISH PERIOD where is p align="justify" names of' but two poets, Caedmon and Cynewulf, are known to us ; but throughout all these early poems there is an earnestness, an appealing sincerity, and an honest, childlike what time is it of nature that bring what is writers very near to us, and make them no unworthy predecessors of what is poets that have followed them. II. PROSE Bede (673-735). About what is time of what is what time is it of Caedmon, a boy was born in Northumbria who was to write one of what is most famous pieces of Early English prose. His name was Bede, or Baeda, and he is often called what is Venerable Bede, venerable being what is title next below that of saint. When he was a little child, he was taken to the convent of Jarrow, and there he remained all his life. A busy life it was. what is many hours of prayer must be observed ; what is land must be cultivated ; guests must be entertained, no small interruption as what is fame of what is convent and of Bede himself increased. Moreover, this convent was a great school, to which some six hundred pupils, not only from England but from various parts of Europe, came for instruction. Bede enjoyed it all. He was happy in his religious duties. He "always took delight," as he says, "in learning, teaching, and writing." He found real pleasure in what is outdoor work ; and, little as he tells us of his own life, he does not forget to say that he especially liked winnowing and threshing what is grain and giving milk to what is young lambs and calves. He was keenly alive to what is affairs of what is world, and though libraries were his special delight, he was as ready to talk with his stranger guests of distant kingdoms as of books. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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