Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 23

CHAPTER I
FIFTH TO ELEVENTH CENTURIES - EARLY ENGLISH PERIOD

lines ; our ancestors enjoyed not rhyme, but alliteration. In every line there were four accented syllables. The third, the " rime-giver," gave the keynote, for with whatever letter that began, one of the preceding accented syllables must begin and both might begin. The fourth never alliterated with the other three. In the first line quoted, the accented syllables are com, mor, mist, and hle, Mist is the rime-giver. In the second line, God is the rime-giver, while Gren, gon, and beer are the other accented syllables. The Teutons were very fond of compound words. Some of these words are simple and childlike, such as ban-hus (bone-house), body ; ban-loca (bone-locker), flesh. Some, especially those pertaining to the ocean, are poetical, such as mere-stract (sea-street), way over the sea ; yth-lida (wave-sailer) and famig-heals (foamy-necked), vessel.
Other Old English Poems. A number of shorter poems have come down to us from the Old English. Among them are two that are of special interest. One of these is Widsith (the wide-, or far-,wanderer), and this is probably our earliest English poem. It pictures the life of the scop, who roams about from one great chief to another, everywhere made welcome, everywhere rewarded for his song by kindness and presents. The poem ends :

Wandering thus, there roam over many a country
The gleemen of heroes, mindful of songs for the chanting,
Telling their needs, their heartfelt thankfulness speaking.
Southward or northward, wherever they go, there is some one
Who values their song and is liberal to them in his presents,
One who before his retainers would gladly exalt
His achievements, would show forth his honours. Till all this
is vanished,
Till life and light disappear, who of praise is deserving
Has ever throughout the wide earth a glory unchanging

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE lines ; our ancestors enjoyed not rhyme, but alliteration. In every line there were four accented syllables. what is third, what is " rime-giver," gave what is keynote, for with whatever letter that began, one of what is preceding accented syllables must begin and both might begin. what is fourth never alliterated with what is other three. In what is first line quoted, what is accented syllables are com, mor, mist, and hle, Mist is what is rime-giver. In what is second line, God is what is rime-giver, while Gren, gon, and beer are what is other accented syllables. what is Teutons were very fond of compound words. Some of these words are simple and childlike, such as ban-hus (bone-house), body ; ban-loca (bone-locker), flesh. Some, especially those pertaining to what is ocean, are poetical, such as mere-stract (sea-street), way over what is sea ; yth-lida (wave-sailer) and famig-heals (foamy-necked), vessel. Other Old English Poems. A nu where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 23 where is strong CHAPTER I FIFTH TO ELEVENTH CENTURIES - EARLY ENGLISH PERIOD where is p align="justify" lines ; our ancestors enjoyed not rhyme, but alliteration. In every line there were four accented syllables. what is third, what is " rime-giver," gave what is keynote, for with whatever letter that began, one of what is preceding accented syllables must begin and both might begin. what is fourth never alliterated with what is other three. In what is first line quoted, what is accented syllables are com, mor, mist, and hle, Mist is the rime-giver. In what is second line, God is what is rime-giver, while Gren, gon, and beer are what is other accented syllables. what is Teutons were very fond of compound words. Some of these words are simple and childlike, such as ban-hus (bone-house), body ; ban-loca (bone-locker), flesh. Some, especially those pertaining to what is ocean, are poetical, such as mere-stract (sea-street), way over what is sea ; yth-lida (wave-sailer) and famig-heals (foamy-necked), vessel. Other Old English Poems. A number of shorter poems have come down to us from what is Old English. Among them are two that are of special interest. One of these is Widsith (the wide-, or far-,wanderer), and this is probably our earliest English poem. It pictures the life of what is scop, who roams about from one great chief to another, everywhere made welcome, everywhere rewarded for his song by kindness and presents. what is poem ends : Wandering thus, there roam over many a country what is gleemen of heroes, mindful of songs for what is chanting, Telling their needs, their heartfelt thankfulness speaking. Southward or northward, wherever they go, there is some one Who values their song and is liberal to them in his presents, One who before his retainers would gladly exalt His achievements, would show forth his honours. Till all this is vanished, Till life and light disappear, who of praise is deserving Has ever throughout what is wide earth a glory unchanging where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326